Tata Motors to help Volkswagen develop an Economy Car for emerging markets

One might wonder why Volkswagen approaches Tata Motors to develop a car. Volkswagen has been working on a budget car project since years but failed to keep the costs under control and hence approached Tata Motors(known for developing the world’s cheapest car Nano) for help.

595The auto giant Volkswagen plans to restart its small car project Budget Car. VW management is in talks with with Tata Motors, Manager Magazin reported in its latest issue (release date: July 22).

The Indian automaker should develop the model completely or partially for VW, according to the Wolfsburg Volkswagen headquarters. VW has been working on the project own their own since years. The Budget Car is designed for entry level markets like China and India. For the restart it was internally renamed Economy Car.

The developed in the past model approaches were repeatedly stopped. The VW developers did not get especially the costs under control. The car will be offered cheaper than the previously smallest VW model. The responsibility for the current project lies with brand chief Herbert Diess. Discussions on the possible development contract to Tata would however will be looked after by corporate strategy chief Thomas Sedran.

C--fakepath-Meteor-Silver

The German carmaker has repeatedly tried its hand at the compact car segment including a partnership with Japan’s Suzuki Motor Corporation but failed to crack the intensely competitive market. Tata Motors on the other hand successfully developed and launched one of the world’s cheapest cars Nano, highlighting its expertise in low cost vehicle development.

via: Manager Magazin

Advertisements

Black box in cars! Germany plans a legislation making ‘black box’ mandatory for autonomous cars

The fatal crash of a Tesla Model S car in its autopilot mode has increased the pressure on industry executives and regulators to ensure that automated driving technology can be deployed safely.

Germany plans new legislation to require manufacturers of cars equipped with an autopilot function to install a black box to help determine responsibility in the event of an accident, transport ministry sources told Reuters on Monday.

fdr_sidefront
Black box flight recorder for illustrative purpose

The fatal crash of a Tesla Model S car in its autopilot mode has increased the pressure on industry executives and regulators to ensure that automated driving technology can be deployed safely.

Under the proposal from Transport Minister Alexander Dobrindt, drivers will not have to pay attention to traffic or concentrate on steering, but must remain seated at the wheel so they can intervene in the event of an emergency.

Manufacturers will also be required to install a black box that records when the autopilot system was active, when the driver drove and when the system requested that the driver take over, according to the proposals.

The draft is due to be sent to other ministries for approval this summer, a transport ministry spokesman said.

Germany is home to some of the world’s largest car companies including Volkswagen Group, Daimler and BMW Group and the government wants the industry to become a global player in the market for self-driving vehicles.

Chancellor Angela Merkel said in April the industry should draw up a wish list for Berlin to help develop self-driving vehicles, ideally with a timetable.

Companies around the globe are working on prototypes for self-driving vehicles, but such cars are not expected to be available for the mass market before 2020.

via: ANE