Next step in Northvolt’s site-selection process

Northvolt proceeds with discussions with eight Swedish and two Finnish municipalities to identify the optimal site for a large scale battery production facility. Physical preconditions, logistics, local business climate and the ability to attract highly skilled labor have been particularly important in the selection process. Northvolt are now proceeding discussions with Gothenburg, Gävle, Luleå, Malmö, Mariestad-Skövde, Norrköping, Skellefteå and Västerås in Sweden, and with Kotka-Hamina and Vaasa in Finland.

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Electrification and renewable energy storage are key to a carbon neutral society. Batteries will enable this transition, and help free the world’s electricity generation and distribution from coal, oil and natural gas. Northvolt’s aim is to accelerate this transition by building Europe’s largest battery factory. The ongoing site-selection process is a central and critical part of the ambitious project.

“We’ve been overwhelmed by the interest from municipalities and regions across Scandinavia. We’ve talked to some forty stakeholders and decided to proceed in discussions with eight Swedish and two Finnish municipalities. We’re moving forward swiftly to make sure we’re taking a leading role in the European market”, says Northvolt’s CEO Peter Carlsson.

The requirements for Northvolt’s large-scale battery factory are exceptional considering land suitable for industrial activity, power supply, proximity to water for cooling, conditions for environmental and other permits. These requirements must be able to be fulfilled within a tight timeframe. Additionally, logistic conditions, including access to port, rail and an international airport, are taken into account. Northvolt is also evaluating the local labor market, industrial tradition, and vicinity to universities.

Northvolt will hire a large number of highly specialized engineers, many from Asia or the United States, which adds yet another evaluation criteria as the factory must be located in a region that is attractive to talented professionals.

A new state-of-the-art industry will be established in the municipality where Northvolt will set up the production facility. Northvolt’s assessment is that the battery production alone will employ approximately 2 500 people. The overall regional impact will lead to far more job opportunities, as the factory will bring an increasing demand for transportation, convenience services and public service, as well as housing and education.

Northvolt will continue with in-depth assessments of the remaining municipalities. The aim is to have a decision in place this summer with regards to which sites the company should proceed with for environmental assessments and permitting processes.

Let me express the company’s gratitude to all municipalities who have expressed interest in our selection process, and to the individuals and representatives of the business community for their enthusiasm. Collaboration is necessary to make this project successful. We’ve met strong support for our ambitious plan from both the public and private sectors. We’re confident that we have a competitive business model in place. We have a unique opportunity to build a new industry that will help accelerate the transition into a fossil free society, and at the same time contribute to societal development, growth and thousands of new jobs.” says Peter Carlsson.


Electrification and renewable energy storage are the keys to a carbon neutral society. Batteries will enable the transition. The auto industry alone will need batteries in huge numbers to replace fossil fuels with electricity. The ability to store energy is also crucial to free the world’s energy generation and distribution from coal, oil and natural gas. Northvolt accelerates this transition by building Europe’s largest battery factory.

Press Release

 

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How it all started: The conception of Toyota Prius

On January 16, 1992, the Toyota Motor Corporation announced the Earth Charter, a document outlining goals to develop and market low emission vehicles.

In September 1993 Toyota R&D Executive Vice President Yoshirio Kimbara created G21, a committee to research cars for the 21st century. On February 1, 1994, the first official meeting of the G21 project team took place. The team determined the goal of G21 is to create a car that is resource and environmentally friendly while retaining the benefits of modern cars. The development effort was led by Takehisa Yaegashi, who was tasked with building a car that bridged the gap between electric and gasoline powered vehicles.

In 1994, Toyota executive Takeshi Uchiyamada was given the task of creating a new car that would be both fuel efficient and environmentally friendly. In late 1994, the G21 team designed a concept car with a hybrid engine for the 1995 Tokyo Motor Show. The vehicle was named “Prius,” the Latin word for “prior” or “before.” It was shown on October 27, 1995. In late 1996, test driving began.

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1996 Prius Prototype . Image source Wikimedia Commons

After reviewing over 100 hybrid designs, the engineering team ultimately settled on a continuously variable transmission (CVT) design based largely on a 2000 TRW patent application, but many technical and engineering problems had to be solved within the three years that the team was given to bring the car to the Japanese market, a goal they barely achieved as the first Prius went on sale in December 1997. One major problem was the longevity of the battery, which needed to last between 7 and 10 years. The solution the engineers came up with was to keep the battery pack between 60% and 40% charged, proving to be the “sweet spot” for extending the battery life to roughly that of the other car components. A Toyota spokesperson stated that “Toyota chose this name because the Prius vehicle is the predecessor of cars to come.”

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Battery pack from second generation Prius

Initially, in December 10 1997, first Prius went on sale in the domestic market that is Japan. At the time of launch, first generation Prius, was the world’s first mass produced gasoline-electric hybrid car. Later in 2001, more powerful version was introduced in United States Of America.

The Prius is sold in over 90 markets, with Japan and the United States being its largest markets. Global cumulative Prius liftback sales reached the milestone 1 million vehicle mark in May 2008, 2 million in September 2010, and passed the 3 million mark in June 2013. Cumulative sales of 1 million Priuses were achieved in the US by early April 2011,and Japan reached the 1 million mark in August 2011.As of April 2016, the Prius liftback is the world’s top selling hybrid car with 3.73 million units sold.

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First generation Prius
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Second generation Prius
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Third generation Prius
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Fourth generation Prius

 

Source: Wikipedia

 

World Premiere: Mercedes-Benz Future Bus CityPilot

The Mercedes-Benz Future Bus with CityPilot made its first public journey on part of Europe’s longest BRT route (BRT = Bus Rapid Transit) in the Netherlands. This links Amsterdam’s Schiphol airport with the town of Haarlem. This almost 20 km long route is a real challenge for the Mercedes-Benz Future Bus, as it has numerous bends and passes through tunnels and across junctions with traffic lights.

What urban public transport will look like in the future is shown by the semi-automated city bus with CityPilot – it operates even more safely, efficiently and comfortably than conventional buses. Connectivity plus camera and radar systems with data fusion are catapulting the city bus into the future. Mercedes-Benz is showing this spectacular technology on an equally spectacular technology platform, the Mercedes-Benz Future Bus with CityPilot.

The technology of the CityPilot in the Mercedes-Benz Future Bus is based on that of the autonomously driving Mercedes-Benz Actros truck with Highway Pilot presented two years ago. It has however undergone substantial further development specifically for use in a city bus, with numerous added functions. The CityPilot is able to recognise traffic lights, communicate with them and safely negotiate junctions controlled by them. It can also recognise obstacles, especially pedestrians on the road, and brake autonomously. It approaches bus stops automatically, where it opens and closes its doors. And not least, it is able to drive through tunnels.

Just under a dozen cameras scan the road and surroundings, while long and short-range radar systems constantly monitor the route ahead. There is also a GPS system. Thanks to data fusion, all the data received create an extremely precise picture and allow the bus to be positioned to within centimetres. This already works in practice, as demonstrated by the world premiere of the CityPilot on an exacting route covering almost 20 km, with a number of tight bends, tunnels, numerous bus stops and involving high speeds for a city bus.

This semi-automated city bus improves safety, as it relieves its driver’s workload and nothing remains hidden from its cameras and radar systems. It improves efficiency, as its smooth, predictive driving style saves wear and tear while lowering fuel consumption and emissions. With its smooth and even rate of travel it also improves the comfort of its passengers.

via: daimler.com