VIDEO: Here’s how they do things at Royal Enfield

Cult Indian motorcycling brand, Royal Enfield has been around for years. The Chennai based two-wheeler maker has stayed true to its roots and has been making its iconic motorcycles for decades. In this article, we get a glimpse of what goes into making different Royal Enfield motorcycles that make them so special. First up are the Madras Stripes. Later about chestnut color and about chrome.

Here is how they do it and what the company says about its products:




via VIDEO: Here’s how they do things at Royal Enfield — Motoroids

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[Jobs] Current Openings at Car2Go, a Daimler AG subsidiary

Current Openings

Serial# Job Title Location Description & Apply link
1 Member Services Associate Austin, Texas Click Here
2 Digital Marketing Intern Austin, Texas Click Here
3 Financial Analyst Austin, Texas Click Here
4 Communications Coordinator Austin, Texas Click Here

About Car2Go

Car2Go is a car sharing service which gives you all the conveniences of owning a car without owning one. It takes away from you all the burdens of owning a car like refueling, servicing, cleaning and insuring etc. Car2Go vehicles are available all over the cities they serve, you have just hop into the car, drive to your desired destination and hop out. For further details about the company visit the website.

car2go

Car2Go is a subsidiary of Daimler AG (parent company of Mercedes-Benz) providing carsharing services in European and North American cities. The company offers exclusively Smart Fortwo and Mercedes-Benz vehicles and features one-way point-to-point rentals. Users are charged by the minute, with hourly and daily rates available.The service forgoes the typical centralized rental office, and cars are user-accessed wherever parked via a downloadable smartphone app. As of May 2015, Car2Go is the largest carsharing company in the world with over 1,000,000 members.

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[Jobs] Current Openings at Zoomcar, a self-drive car rental company

zoomcar

aza-nw3dZoomcar is the first company in India to focus on self-drive car rental, in contrast to earlier companies in India that focused on chauffeur-driven rentals. Zoomcar was founded by David Back and Greg Moran in February 2013 in Bangalore, India. As of July 2016, the company operates a fleet of over 2,000 vehicles in 9 cities across the country including Bangalore, New Delhi, Gurgaon,Mumbai, Navi Mumbai, Hyderabad, Chennai, Pune and Chandigarh.

Zoomcar raises $24M in series B funding round led by Ford, to strengthen its marketplace model ZAP 

Here is the list of current openings:

Serial # Job Title Location Description & Apply link
Technology
1 Principal Software Developer Bangalore Click Here
2 iOS Developer Bangalore Click Here
3 UI Developer Bangalore Click Here
4 Senior Software Developer Bangalore Click Here
5 Android Developer Bangalore Click Here
Analytics
6 Sr Analyst/Manager Analytics Bangalore Click Here
Product
7 Associate Product Manager Bangalore Click Here
8 Product Analyst Bangalore Click Here

Zoomcar

How BMW chose the right five-axis machine and CNC for processing fast bikes

BMW motorcycles are known for their reliability, quality, performance and safety. This is not achieved by chance, however. BMW’s motorcycle plant in Berlin, Germany, uses a variety of tools to create numerous key components on-site, from frames and valve shafts to connecting rods and cylinder heads.

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Among the tools used are Grob’s horizontal five-axis G550 machining centers featuring Siemens’ Sinumerik 840D controllers, used to manufacture cylinder heads for flat and four-cylinder engines.

When BMW invests in new machining centers, it compares among various suppliers to ensure that the machining center will enable the company to manufacture components more cost-effectively than external contractors.

One of BMW’s primary reasons for choosing the G550 was because it was equipped with a Siemens CNC. Thanks to previous positive experience with Siemens, the manufacturing specialists in Berlin already employed the company’s CNCs for 90 percent of their controllers. This offered both operators and tool setters the flexibility to work on practically any of the machines in the plant. Other key machine spec requirements included adequate space for manufacturing all relevant components, high levels of precision and surface finish, compliance with predefined cycle times, and the ability to reuse all current tools and equipment.

Before committing to the new investment, BMW production engineers worked to investigate the effectiveness of the Grob machines in cylinder head production. Initially, it was the G550’s near-identical sibling, the G350, that was under consideration. However, the working space available was deemed too small to accommodate all the required processing tasks. The G550, on the other hand, satisfied that requirement. Among other factors, the horizontal design of the G550, which has both rotary axes in the work area, contributes significantly to its high rigidity. As a result, axial deviation remains under 10 micrometers. The level of precision that can be achieved is correspondingly high, even when processing hard materials such as those used for valve seat inserts. The machine also produces a high-quality surface finish, with roughness ranging to 2 micrometers.

According to Christian Heib, applications engineer at Grob, another benefit of the horizontal design was that “tool life can be increased by approximately 30 percent compared with that of vertical machining centers. The problem of jammed slivers is almost completely eliminated because they are not able to fall onto the workpiece in the first place, but instead fall right through to the ground.”

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One of the G550’s strengths is its compact footprint of 3,800 × 6,300 mm. Despite its size, the machining center features a Z-axis stroke of 1,020 mm, meaning that tools as long as 500 mm can be retracted completely out of the work area and into the spindle tunnel. The swivel-mounted shuttle table is another feature that helps deliver high levels of productivity. While one workpiece is being processed, the next can be clamped and set, minimizing downtime.

Thanks to its usability and intuitive operation through various technology cycles, measurement cycles and setting functionality, G550 machines can be set up for new batches quicker than what BMW used before. According to Heib, setups that would have previously taken several hours can now be accomplished in a matter of minutes.

Along with the tools and equipment from the current machines, the German motorcycle manufacturer was able to reuse all its existing programs as well. It took a single employee only two days to upgrade these programs to be compatible with the latest software, which can be loaded onto the relevant machine as required either over the network or from a USB flash drive. The modern Windows Explorer-style program manager means that complex programs can be managed either on the Compact Flash (CF) card or directly on the CNC.

If problems arise while the machine is operational, BMW Production Engineer Taner and his colleagues use the network-based remote maintenance functionality provided by Grob. Although Ögretmen reports that it has rarely been required so far, the process has proved to be extremely smooth and efficient.

Grob can also perform minor optimizations together with Siemens using the teleservice. This is usually done automatically and without any disruption to ongoing production.

The Sinumerik-controlled Grob machines have met every expectation in full, which is why BMW has already ordered an additional four G550s.

Reblogged from Techspex

About Techspex                                                

Techspex provides metalworkers free research and analysis tools to help them find the right machine for their job. The website’s database contains detailed specs for over 600 machine tool brands and 7500 new models. It maintains the deepest up-to-date machine tool and model information.

How it all started: The conception of Toyota Prius

On January 16, 1992, the Toyota Motor Corporation announced the Earth Charter, a document outlining goals to develop and market low emission vehicles.

In September 1993 Toyota R&D Executive Vice President Yoshirio Kimbara created G21, a committee to research cars for the 21st century. On February 1, 1994, the first official meeting of the G21 project team took place. The team determined the goal of G21 is to create a car that is resource and environmentally friendly while retaining the benefits of modern cars. The development effort was led by Takehisa Yaegashi, who was tasked with building a car that bridged the gap between electric and gasoline powered vehicles.

In 1994, Toyota executive Takeshi Uchiyamada was given the task of creating a new car that would be both fuel efficient and environmentally friendly. In late 1994, the G21 team designed a concept car with a hybrid engine for the 1995 Tokyo Motor Show. The vehicle was named “Prius,” the Latin word for “prior” or “before.” It was shown on October 27, 1995. In late 1996, test driving began.

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1996 Prius Prototype . Image source Wikimedia Commons

After reviewing over 100 hybrid designs, the engineering team ultimately settled on a continuously variable transmission (CVT) design based largely on a 2000 TRW patent application, but many technical and engineering problems had to be solved within the three years that the team was given to bring the car to the Japanese market, a goal they barely achieved as the first Prius went on sale in December 1997. One major problem was the longevity of the battery, which needed to last between 7 and 10 years. The solution the engineers came up with was to keep the battery pack between 60% and 40% charged, proving to be the “sweet spot” for extending the battery life to roughly that of the other car components. A Toyota spokesperson stated that “Toyota chose this name because the Prius vehicle is the predecessor of cars to come.”

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Battery pack from second generation Prius

Initially, in December 10 1997, first Prius went on sale in the domestic market that is Japan. At the time of launch, first generation Prius, was the world’s first mass produced gasoline-electric hybrid car. Later in 2001, more powerful version was introduced in United States Of America.

The Prius is sold in over 90 markets, with Japan and the United States being its largest markets. Global cumulative Prius liftback sales reached the milestone 1 million vehicle mark in May 2008, 2 million in September 2010, and passed the 3 million mark in June 2013. Cumulative sales of 1 million Priuses were achieved in the US by early April 2011,and Japan reached the 1 million mark in August 2011.As of April 2016, the Prius liftback is the world’s top selling hybrid car with 3.73 million units sold.

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First generation Prius
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Second generation Prius
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Third generation Prius
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Fourth generation Prius

 

Source: Wikipedia